Barcelona: La Sagrada Familia

Looks a bit gaudy (I mean Gaudi)

Exterior of the Church

One of the most memorable sites we saw in Barcelona was La Sagrada Familia (The Sacred Family). It is actually the most visited attraction in Barcelona – so make sure you make reservations ahead of time if you want to see the inside.

It’s hard to get a really good picture of it because it is so large.  Also, the exterior of the church is still undergoing construction and there are cranes around it. They actually began building the church 130 years ago and they don’t expect to finish it until at least 2026.  All entry fees are going toward it’s completion.

The design is very unique – a mix of Gothic and Modernism – almost like two different buildings in one.  It’s been called everything from “hideous” and “strange” to “spiritual”, “sensual” and “exuberant”.   It is definitely “over-the-top” and completely different than any building or church I have ever seen before.

There is a great explanation of Antoni Gaudi’s designs and inspirations inside the church.  I appreciated it because I like how Gaudi’s architectural inspiration came from nature.  He did not use straight lines…since there are no straight lines in nature.  All the designs in his buildings are based on nature itself (animals, plants, and minerals).  Robert appreciated it for all the mathematics involved (parabolas, hyperbolas, ellipses, polygons, etc).

The most recent construction work is very modern looking and (I think) deviates from the portion that was constructed during Gaudi’s lifetime.  However, Gaudi’s plans were such that he wanted it to evolve over time.  The main entrance to the church is through massive metal doors – completely covered with words and symbols.  The inside of the church is very light, open and spacious.  There are some simplistic drawings on the floors but the ceiling is incredibly detailed and beautiful…it was like looking into a kaleidoscope.  The main pillars are the size of giant sequoias soaring up and branching out into the ceiling.  The four center pillars have the names of the four evangelists on them.  The sides are full of stained glass windows and there are spiraling staircases going up each tower.  Above the alter is a crucified Christ suspended by a stained glass parachute.  Below the alter is a small chapel and a crypt where Gaudi is buried.

Inside La Sagrada Famila

The outside currently has 3 sides and 8 towers.  Only two sides are done.  When it’s finished there will be 18 towers (one for each apostle, each evangelist, Mary and Jesus), eventually making it the tallest church in the world.   The first side (the Nativity) was constructed when Gaudi was alive.  It is incredibly detailed.  It depicts events related to life.  There are religious scenes from Christ’s life (his birth, Mary, Joseph, angels, rosaries), but there also lots of other symbols of life in general (trees, flowers, leaves, vines, branches, coral, birds, turtles, chameleons, horses, etc).

Detail of the Nativity Side

The second side (the Passion) was started in the 1950’s and it depicts images related to death (the stations of the cross, skulls, bones, etc) and more symbolism (alpha and omega, magic squares).  This side is very modern looking (not anywhere near as detailed) and very different than the first side.

Detail of the Passion Side

The last side (Glory) is just a solid block right now.  It will eventually depict images of the resurrection and afterlife.  Under the church is also a large museum containing not only the designs and complete history of the church but also a workshop where people are actually creating pieces for the exterior.  It’s all really interesting and fascinating…a true work in progress.

La Sagrada Familia is one of those few places that you will think about long after you’ve left.  There is so much to look at and absorb…no matter how long you are there, you won’t see it all.  Even now I look at our pictures and I see things I didn’t see before.  It is an amazing place.